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Pharmacy: Guidelines for Citing Resources

Vancouver Style

Vancouver Style was formally codified by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE).  

This citation style is very different from MLA or APA.  Invest time in reading over the conventions before you start your research.

Do's and Don't's

DO use Vancouver Style.

DO use in-text references when paraphrasing or quoting from a source.

DO create a reference list at the end of your paper/care plan that includes all references used.

DO paraphrase adequately - Try these tips.

DO cite original sources

DO NOT "cut and paste" without attribution. 

DO NOT cite Wikipedia.

DO NOT cite lectures/lecture notes.

Reference Lists

  • List all references cited in your paper/care plan
  • List references in the order in which they appear in your paper/care plan
  • Number your references using Arabic numerals - these must match those used in text
  • Begin the Reference list on a new page and title it "References"

In Text Citations

  • Use in text citations whenever you use a reference (quoting, paraphrasing, summarizing, etc.)
  • In text citations are numbered in the order in which they appear in your text
    • If you use a reference again, continue to use the same number for it
  • Use square or round brackets, but be consistent
  • Use only Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3...)
  • Reference numbers follow punctuation (place them after commas and fullstops)

Examples of Vancouver Style

EXAMPLE 1 (Journal Article, print):

Metformin is the drug of choice for type 2 diabetes.(1)

OR

“Metformin should be the initial drug used”.(1,pS66)

References:

1)    Harper W, Clement M, Goldenberg R, et al. Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada: pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes. Can J Diabetes 2013;37(suppl 1):S61-S68.

 

EXAMPLE 2 (Journal Article, online):

Metformin is the drug of choice for type 2 diabetes.(1)

OR

“Metformin should be the initial drug used”.(1,pS66)

References:

1)    Harper W, Clement M, Goldenberg R, et al. Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada: pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes. Can J Diabetes 2013;37(suppl 1):S61-S68. DOI:10.1016/j.jcjd.2013.01.021.

 

 

EXAMPLE 3 (Database found online):

“Primarily, nonpharmacologic therapies should be utilized.”(1)

References:

1)    Kerr K.  Chronic fatigue syndrome. In: Compendium of Therapeutic Choices [Internet]. Ottawa (ON): Canadian Pharmacists Association; c2018 [updated March 2018; cited 2018 Aug 23]. Available from: https://www.myrxtx.ca.

 

EXAMPLE 4 (Chapter in an e-Book):

“Start most patients on an SSRI, an SNRI, mirtazapine, or bupropion.”(1)

References:

1)     Depression. In AAFP Conditions A-Z [Internet].  American Academy of Family Physicians; c2018 [updated 2017 June; cited 2018 Aug]. [about 10 p.]. Available from www.online.statref.com

 

EXAMPLE 5 (Part of a print book):

Using venlafaxine during the 3rd trimester could be potentially dangerous to the child. (1)

OR

“The use of venlafaxine late in the 3rd trimester may result in function and behavioural deficits in the newborn infant”(1, p.1466)

References:

1)     Briggs GG, Freeman RK. Drugs in pregnancy and lactation: A reference guide to fetal and neonatal risk.  10th ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer; c2015. Venlfaxine; p. 1466-1469.

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